Friday, August 11, 2017

The Great Graphic Boom Art in America, 1960-1990



National Museum of Oslo
3 March - 28 May 2017
Staatsgalerie Stuttgart

14 July - 5 November 2017


In cooperation with the National Museum of Oslo, the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart is presenting exceptional works of American graphic art of the period from 1960 to 1990.




Roy Lichtenstein, Sweet Dreams, Baby!, 1965, Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Graphische Sammlung © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/ VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 201
 
 
 
"M-Maybe," a 1965 pop art painting by Roy Lichtenstein


https://www.staatsgalerie.de/en/press/great-graphic-boom-engl/sgs.html

Printmaking had previously served primarily to make religious or political content accessible to a broad public and as an important means communication in other areas as well. In the early twentieth century it was above all the German Expressionists who devoted themselves to this technique quite extensively. Decades later, in the late 1950s, the U.S. then experienced a veritable “graphic boom”.
At this point in time, the most prominent artists of the American avant-garde – exponents of Abstract Expressionism, Hard Edge, Pop Art, Minimal Art and other currents – began experimenting and working with a wide variety of printmaking techniques.

Publishing companies specializing in printmaking – for example Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) in New York, founded by Tatyana Grosman in 1957, or GEMINI G.E.L (Graphic Editions Limited) in Los Angeles, established in 1966 – played a special role, owing above all to the high standards they set for graphic art. Individual sheets, portfolios and artists’ books were produced in great numbers. Especially the Pop artists used printmaking as a means of responding to industrial mass production and the advertising language of the media.

The majority of the artists had already made names for themselves as painters. At the same time – following in the footprints of the pioneers of modern graphic art such as Paul Gaugin, Edvard Munch and Pablo Picasso – they employed above all lithography and screen printing, but also other printmaking techniques, to arrive at individual artistic formulations.

The exhibition will feature some 170 sheets offering impressively broad insight into the styles and manifestations of American printmaking and its establishment as an independent art form.
Organized by the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart in collaboration with the Nasjonalmuseet Oslo.

Works by 23 artists, both well-known and less familiar, are on display. Featured attractions include





Barnett Newman 1905-1970
P01027-44 Eighteen Cantos 1963-4
Series of eighteen lithographs of various sizes
Presented by Mrs Annalee Newman 1972
Tate Gallery,

Barnett Newman's major Cantos series (1964)

and Agnes Martin's On a Clear Day (1973), as well as Robert Rauschenberg's use of found objects and Jasper Johns's reworking of mundane subject matter such as flags and letters. Lithography and silk-screen prints were the media of choice for many artists, while Helen Frankenthaler, Donald Judd, and Brice Marden explored older techniques such as woodcuts and etching.



Roy Lichtenstein's famous Brushstroke is a natural inclusion here, as are



 Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Graphische Sammlung, Leihgabe 1968 Kultusministerium Baden-Württemberg, © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts,



Andy Warhol's portraits of Elizabeth Taylor and Jackie Kennedy. Other highlights include Warhol's Campbell's soup cans



and Louise Bourgeois's Ste Sebastienne.



Savarin, 1981, Jasper Johns given as a gift to the National Museum as a honor to Her Majesty Queen Sonja. Foto: Børre Høstland/Nasjonalmuseet


Artists represented:

Willem de Kooning (1904–1997), Barnett Newman (1905–1970), Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010), Agnes Martin (1912–2004), Jackson Pollock (1912–1956), Robert Motherwell (1915–1991), Sam Francis (1923–1994), Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997), Robert Rauschenberg (1925–2008), Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011), Robert Indiana (*1928), Donald Judd (1928–1994), Cy Twombly (1928–2011), Andy Warhol (1928–1987), Jasper Johns (*1930), Lee Bontecou (*1931), John Baldessari (* 1931), Frank Stella (*1936), Ed Ruscha (*1937), Richard Serra (*1939), Bruce Nauman (*1941)



Sam Francis, The White Line (Die weiße Linie), 1960, Farblithographie auf elfenbeinfarbenem Papier, 90,5 x 63 cm, Staatsgalerie Stuttgart,

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Fragonard: The Fantasy Figures

National Gallery of Art,
October 8–December 3, 2017



Jean Honoré Fragonard, Young Girl Reading, c. 1769, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mrs. Mellon Bruce in memory of her father, Andrew W. Mellon

Jean Honoré Fragonard, Young Girl Reading, c. 1769, oil on canvas,
National Gallery of Art, Washington, 
Gift of Mrs. Mellon Bruce in memory of her father, Andrew W. Mellon


Combining art, fashion, science, and conservation, the revelatory exhibition Fragonard: The Fantasy Figures brings together—for the first time—a newly discovered drawing by Jean Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806) and some 14 of his paintings that have been identified with it including the Gallery's own Young Girl Reading (c. 1769).

Fragonard is considered among the most characteristic and important French painters of his era, and this series casts light on the development of his career, the identity of his sitters and patrons, and the significance of his innovative imagery. Fragonard: The Fantasy Figures and the fully illustrated catalog that accompanies it not only present new art-historical and scientific research into this series but also examine the 18th-century Parisian world in which these paintings were created. The exhibition may be seen only at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in the West Building, from October 8 through December 3, 2017.


Jean Honoré Fragonard
Sketches of Portraits, c. 1769
drawing
unframed: 23 x 35 cm (9 1/16 x 13 3/4 in.)
Private Collection, Paris


Covered with 18 thumbnail-sized sketches and apparently annotated in the rococo artist's own hand, the drawing now known as Sketches of Portraits emerged at a Paris auction in 2012 and upended several long-held assumptions about the fantasy figures—a series of rapidly executed, brightly colored paintings of lavishly costumed individuals.

"The first exhibition to unite the fantasy figures with the recently discovered drawing focuses on this aspect of Fragonard's production in a powerful and intimate way," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art, Washington. "We are grateful to the public and private collections, both here and abroad, that have generously lent to this exhibition, as well as to Lionel and Ariane Sauvage whose gift supported the catalog's publication."

Fragonard: The Fantasy Figures explores the many interpretations of this series in the context of the artist's career. Fragonard strove to create a specific portrait type that showcased the painterly skill for which he was renowned. The fantasy figures also enabled him to experiment and to refine his ideas of artistic reference and emulation. Created within the competitive atmosphere of the Parisian art world, these works were influenced by a range of events, artworks, and visitors to his studio.

The fantasy figures depict men and women posed at leisure or employed in various pursuits, such as acting, reading, writing, playing instruments, or singing. Wearing extravagant attire, these figures are dressed in what was known in 18th-century France as à l'espagnole (Spanish style)—plumed hats, slashed sleeves, ribbons, rosettes, ruffs, capes, and accents of red and black. Shaped by artistic imagination, these paintings pushed the boundaries of accepted figure painting at the time.

Exhibited for the first time is the newly discovered Sketches of Portraits (c. 1769), a thin sheet of paper with three rows of 18 small sketches—all but one are annotated with a name, 14 have been identified with one of Fragonard's painted fantasy figures, and four remain unknown. The emergence of Sketches of Portraits prompted a two-year investigation of Young Girl Reading, conducted as a collaborative effort by the Gallery's Yuriko Jackall, assistant curator of French paintings, John K. Delaney, senior imaging scientist, and Michael Swicklik, senior conservator of paintings. Published in the April 2015 issue of Burlington Magazine, the findings established Young Girl Reading as a part of the fantasy figure series and shed light upon Fragonard's approach to the ensemble as a whole.






Jean Honoré Fragonard
François-Henri, duc d'Harcourt, c. 1770
oil on canvas
overall: 81 x 65 cm (31 7/8 x 25 9/16 in.)
Private Collection





Jean Honoré Fragonard
Anne-François d'Harcourt, duc de Beuvron, c. 1770
oil on canvas
overall: 81.5 x 65 cm (32 1/16 x 25 9/16 in.)
Private Collection


Other works in the exhibition include the rarely lent, privately held portraits of the Harcourt brothers François-Henri, duc d'Harcourt (c. 1770) and Anne-François d'Harcourt, duc de Beuvron (c. 1770)—which are on view together for the first time since the 1987 exhibition Fragonard at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Musée du Louvre—



Jean Honoré Fragonard
The Vestal, c. 1769–1771
oil on canvas
overall: 80 x 63 cm (31 1/2 x 24 13/16 in.)
with frame: 98 x 83 x 10 cm
Private Collection, courtesy Etienne Breton, Saint Honoré Art Consulting, Paris

as well as The Vestal (c. 1769–1771),  

Jean Honoré Fragonard
The Actor, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 81 x 65 cm (31 7/8 x 25 9/16 in.)
framed: 106.68 x 89.54 cm (42 x 35 1/4 in.)
Private Collection

The Actor (c. 1769),



Jean Honoré Fragonard
The Singer, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 81 x 65 cm (31 7/8 x 25 9/16 in.)
Private Collection
and The Singer (c. 1769).

 


Jean Honoré Fragonard
M. de La Bretèche, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 80 x 65 cm (31 1/2 x 25 9/16 in.)
framed: 112 x 87.5 cm (44 1/8 x 34 7/16 in.)
Musée du Louvre, Département des Peintures, Paris
© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY
Also on view is the Louvre's M. de La Bretèche (c. 1769), which depicts the wealthy brother of one of Fragonard's most devoted patrons, Jean-Claude Richard, abbé de Saint-Non.

The exhibition is curated by Yuriko Jackall, assistant curator, department of French paintings, National Gallery of Art.



The 176-page, fully illustrated exhibition catalog includes an overview and technical examination by Yuriko Jackall with John K. Delaney and Michael Swicklik, all at the National Gallery of Art, and essays by Carole Blumenfeld, research associate at the Palais Fesch-Musée des Beaux-Arts d'Ajaccio; Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell, fashion historian; Jean-Pierre Cuzin, former director of the department of paintings at the Musée du Louvre, Paris; Elodie Kong, an art historian specializing in the collecting habits of financiers in 18th-century Paris; and Satish Padiyar, senior lecturer in 19th-century European art at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

Also see Fragonard and the Fantasy Figure: Painting the Imagination





Jean Honoré Fragonard
The Warrior, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 81.5 x 65.4 cm (32 1/16 x 25 3/4 in.)
framed: 110.81 x 93.98 x 10.48 cm (43 5/8 x 37 x 4 1/8 in.)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts
Image © Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, USA (photo by
Michael Agee)



Jean Honoré Fragonard
Woman with a Dog, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 81.3 x 65.4 cm (32 x 25 3/4 in.)
framed: 106.7 x 90.2 x 9.5 cm (42 x 35 1/2 x 3 3/4 in.)
Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1937 (37.118)
Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image Source: Art Resource, NY



Jean Honoré Fragonard
Man in Costume, c. 1767-1768
oil on canvas
80.3 x 64.7 cm (31 5/8 x 25 1/2 in.)
The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Mary and Leigh Block in honor of John Maxon, 1977.123
Photography © The Art Institute of Chicago




Jean Honoré Fragonard
The Writer, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 80.5 x 64.5 cm (31 11/16 x 25 3/8 in.)
framed: 115 x 91 cm (45 1/4 x 35 13/16 in.)
Musée du Louvre, Département des Peintures, Paris
© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY




Jean Honoré Fragonard
Portrait of a Man, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 85 x 65 cm (33 7/16 x 25 9/16 in.)
framed: 113 x 90.5 cm (44 1/2 x 35 5/8 in.)
Musée du Louvre, Département des Peintures, Paris
© RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY




Jean Honoré Fragonard
Cavalier Seated by a Fountain, c. 1769
oil on canvas
overall: 94 x 74 cm (37 x 29 1/8 in.)
Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, Bequest of Francesc Cambó, 1949




Jean Honoré Fragonard
Portrait of a Man, c. 1775
oil on canvas
overall: 72 x 59.5 cm (28 3/8 x 23 7/16 in.)
framed: 95.4 x 83.5 x 7.5 cm (37 9/16 x 32 7/8 x 2 15/16 in.)
Petit Palais, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris
© Petit Palais / Roger-Violet







Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Max Ernst: Beyond Painting

The Museum of Modern Art 

September 23, 2017–January 01, 2018

This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany. 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went “beyond painting” to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II.

Featuring approximately 100 works drawn from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition includes paintings that challenged material and compositional conventions; collages and overpaintings utilizing found printed reproductions; frottages (rubbings); illustrated books and collage novels; sculptures of painted stone and bronze; and prints made using a range of techniques.

Several major, multipart projects represent key moments in Ernst’s long career, ranging from early Dada and Surrealist portfolios of the late 1910s and 1920s to his late masterpiece—a recent acquisition to MoMA’s collection






Max Ernst. Folio 10 from 65 Maximiliana or the Illegal Exercise of Astronomy (65 Maximiliana ou l’exercice illégal de l’astronomie). 1964. Illustrated book with twenty‑eight etchings (nine with aquatint) and six aquatints by Ernst and letterpress typographic designs by Ilia Zdanevich (Iliazd). Page: 16 1/16 × 12 1/16″ (40.8 × 30.7 cm). Publisher: Le Degré 41 (Iliazd), Paris. Printer: Georges Visat. Edition: 65. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of David S. Orentreich, MD, 2015. Photo: Peter Butler. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.
65 Maximiliana, ou l’exercice illégale de l’astronomie (1964). This illustrated book comprises 34 aquatints complemented by imaginative typographic designs and a secret hieroglyphic script of the artist’s own invention.


Max Ernst. Plate I from Let There Be Fashion, Down with Art (Fiat modes pereat ars). c. 1919. One from a portfolio of eight lithographs. Sheet: 17 3/16 x 12 9/16″ (43 x 31.9 cm). Publisher: Schlömilch Verlag, Cologne. Printer: unknown, Cologne. Edition: 60 announced; only a few known sets. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1935. Photo: John Wronn. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. The Hat Makes the Man (C’est le chapeau qui fait l’homme). 1920. Gouache, pencil, oil, and ink on cut‑and‑pasted printed paper on paper. 13 7/8 x 17 3/4″ (35.2 x 45.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1935. Photo: Paige Knight. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. The Gramineous Bicycle Garnished with Bells the Dappled Fire Damps and the Echinoderms Bending the Spine to Look for Caresses (La Biciclette graminée garnie de grelots les grisons grivelés et les échinodermes courbants l’échine pour quêter des caresses). c. 1921. Gouache, ink, and pencil on printed paper on paperboard. 29 1/4 x 39 1/4″ (74.3 x 99.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1937. Photo: Robert Gerhardt. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. Woman, Old Man, and Flower (Weib, Greis und Blume). Paris 1923, Eaubonne 1924. Oil on canvas. 38 x 51 1/4″ (96.5 x 130.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1937. Photo: Kate Keller. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. Two Children Are Threatened by a Nightingale (Deux enfants sont menáces par un rossignol). 1924. Oil on wood with painted wood elements and frame. 27 1/2 x 22 1/2 x 4 1/2″ (69.8 x 57.1 x 11.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase,1937. Photo: Kate Keller. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


Max Ernst. The Wheel of Light (La Roue de la lumière) from Natural History (Histoire naturelle). c. 1925, published 1926. One from a portfolio of 34 collotypes after frottage. Sheet: 12 11/16 × 19 5/8″ (32.3 × 49.8 cm). Publisher: Galerie Jeanne Bucher, Paris. Printer: unknown. Edition: 300. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of James Thrall Soby, 1959. Photo: Peter Butler. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. Rendezvous of Friends ‑ The Friends Become Flowers (Le rendez-vous des amis – Les amis se changent en fleurs). 1928. Oil on canvas. 51 1/8 x 63 3/4″ (129.8 x 161.9 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Samuel A. Berger and the artist (by exchange), 1973. Photo: Paige Knight. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. Birds above the Forest (Oiseaux au-dessus de la forêt). 1929. Oil on canvas. 31 3/4 x 25 1/4″ (80.6 x 64.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Katherine S. Dreier Bequest, 1953. Photo: John Wronn. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Max Ernst. Butterflies (Papillons). 1931. Cut‑and‑pasted printed and painted paper, cellophane, and pencil on paper. 19 3/4 x 25 1/2″ (50.2 x 65.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1935. Photo: John Wronn. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.



Max Ernst. Loplop Introduces Members of the Surrealist Group (Loplop présente les membres du groupe surréaliste). 1931. Cut‑and‑pasted gelatin silver prints, cut‑and‑pasted printed paper, pencil, and pencil frottage on paper. 19 3/4 x 13 1/4″ (50.1 x 33.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1935. Photo: John Wronn. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


Max Ernst. One page from Oedipus (Oedipe), Volume IV, from A Week of Kindness or the Seven Capital Elements (Une Semaine de bonté ou les sept éléments capitaux). 1933–34, published 1934. Line block after collage, from a five-volume serial novel with 182 line blocks after collages. Page: 10 3/4 x 8 1/16″ (27 x 20.5 cm). Publisher: Éditions Jeanne Bucher, Paris. Printer: Georges Duval, Paris. Edition: 812. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Louis E. Stern Collection, 1964. Photo: Robert Gerhardt. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.
Max Ernst: Beyond Painting
Max Ernst. Bird‑Head (Oiseau-tête). 1934‑35. Bronze. 20 5/8 x 15 x 10 3/8″ (52.4 x 38 x 27.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the James Thrall Soby Bequest, 1983. Photo: Thomas Griesel. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.
Max Ernst: Beyond Painting
Max Ernst. Napoleon in the Wilderness. 1941. Oil on canvas. 18 1/4 x 15″ (46.3 x 38.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase and exchange, 1942. Photo: Thomas Griesel. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.
Max Ernst: Beyond Painting
Max Ernst. The Blind Swimmer (Nageur aveugle). 1934. Oil on canvas. 36 3/8 x 29″ (92.3 x 73.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Pierre Matisse and the Helena Rubenstein Fund,1968. Photo: Mali Olatunji. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.


Max Ernst. The King Playing with the Queen (Le roi jouant avec la reine). 1944 (cast 1954). Bronze. Overall: 38 1/2 x 33 x 20 1/2″ (97.8 x 83.8 x 52.1 cm); 20 1/2 x 18 1/2″ (52.1 x 47 cm) at base. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of D. and J. de Menil, 1955. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.










Monday, August 7, 2017

From the MOMA Collection: Artists at Mid to Late Career


The Museum of Modern Art 

Opens November 1, 2017

This presentation in the Museum’s fourth-floor collection galleries will focus exclusively on works made by artists in their mid to late careers. Spanning from the 1960s to today, the installation chronicles the many years of sustained experimentation, daring invention, and thoughtful reconsideration that distinguish an individual artist’s career long after his or her breakthrough moment.

Highlighting lesser-known works by prominent artists and key works by some less familiar names, Artists at Mid to Late Career provides an alternate view of the history of art over the last half century. All works are drawn from MoMA’s collection, with examples by Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Beauford Delaney, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Alice Neel, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, and many others.




Alice Neel (American, 1900–1984). Benny and Mary Ellen Andrews. 1972. Oil on canvas, 60 x 50″ (152.2 x 127 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Gift of Agnes Gund, Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund, Arnold A. Saltzman Fund, and Larry Aldrich Foundation Fund (by exchange).

David Hammons (American, born 1943). Untitled. 2010. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas with plastic, 138 x 108 x 10″ (350.5 x 274.3 x 25.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan L. Halpern and bequest of Richard S. Zeisler (both by exchange). Copyright © 2017 David Hammons.

Ed Clark (American, born 1926). Untitled. 2009. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 81 x 64 1/2″ (205.7 x 163.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Gift of Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin. Copyright © 2017 David Hammons.


Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt) (Venezuelan, born Germany. 1912–1994). Drawing without Paper 84/25 and 84/26. 1984 and 1987. Enamel on wood and stainless steel wire, 23 5/8 x 34 5/8 x 16 3/4″ (60 x 88 x 40 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Susan and Glenn Lowry. Copyright © 2017 Fundación Gego.


Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). From a Day with Juan II. 1977. Oil on canvas, 48 x 36″ (122 x 96 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Georgia O’Keeffe Bequest. Copyright © 2017 The Museum of Modern Art /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Gerhard Richter (German, born 1932). Woods (5). 2005. Oil on canvas, 77 5/8 x 52″ (197.2 x 132.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Gift of Warren and Mitzi Eisenberg and Leonard and Susan Feinstein. Copyright © 2017 Gerhard Richter.



Philip Guston (American, born Canada. 1913–1980). Source.  1976. Oil on canvas, 6′ 3″ x 9′ 9″ (190.5 x 297.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Gift of Edward R. Broida in honor of Uncle Sidney Feldman. Copyright © 2017 The Estate of Philip Guston.


Roy Lichtenstein (American, born Canada. 1913–1980). Interior with Mobile.  1992. Oil and magna on canvas, 10′ 10″ x 14′ 3″ (330.2 x 434.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Enid A. Haupt Fund; gift of Agnes Gund, Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Michael and Judy Ovitz in honor of Roy and Dorothy Lichtenstein; and Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro.